Enhancement of Frequency-Specific Hemodynamic Power and Functional Connectivity by Transcranial Photobiomodulation in Healthy Humans

Truong, Wang, Wanniarachchi, Liu (2022) Enhancement of Frequency-Specific Hemodynamic Power and Functional Connectivity by Transcranial Photobiomodulation in Healthy Humans Front Neurosci 16() 896502
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Abstract

Transcranial photobiomodulation (tPBM) has been considered a safe and effective brain stimulation modality being able to enhance cerebral oxygenation and neurocognitive function. To better understand the underlying neurophysiological effects of tPBM in the human brain, we utilized a 111-channel functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) system to map cerebral hemodynamic responses over the whole head to 8-min tPBM with 1,064-nm laser given on the forehead of 19 healthy participants. Instead of analyzing broad-frequency hemodynamic signals (0-0.2 Hz), we investigated frequency-specific effects of tPBM on three infra-slow oscillation (ISO) components consisting of endogenic, neurogenic, and myogenic vasomotions. Significant changes induced by tPBM in spectral power of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO]), functional connectivity (FC), and global network metrics at each of the three ISO frequency bands were identified and mapped topographically for frequency-specific comparisons. Our novel findings revealed that tPBM significantly increased endogenic Δ[HbO] powers over the right frontopolar area near the stimulation site. Also, we demonstrated that tPBM enabled significant enhancements of endogenic and myogenic FC across cortical regions as well as of several global network metrics. These findings were consistent with recent reports and met the expectation that myogenic oscillation is highly associated with endothelial activity, which is stimulated by tPBM-evoked nitric oxide (NO) release.Copyright © 2022 Truong, Wang, Wanniarachchi and Liu.

Links

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9226485
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35757526
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2022.896502

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